U.S. Army Runs Simulation ‘to Help Develop Robotic Combat Vehicle’

U.S. Army Runs Simulation ‘to Help Develop Robotic Combat Vehicle’

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Will robots operating with no human control be on the battlefield of the future? My assessment is that they will be. The U.S. Army isn’t ready to say the same thing but it is definitely thinking about the idea of semi-autonomous vehicles being on the battlefield. An Aug. 13 press release from the Army announced that, “To help develop robotic combat vehicle, experts at Fort Benning run futuristic computer simulation experiment.”

From the release:

Eventual RCVs could be similar in appearance, role and capability to normal tanks and other armored vehicles, but with a major difference: there’d be no human crew, and instead they’d be operated with minimal control by humans elsewhere on the battlefield.

On top of this, Russia appears to be going full-speed ahead with the idea of semi-autonomous robotic vehicles on the battlefield. And that indicates that fully autonomous vehicles might someday appear. Indeed, there are hints that this is where things are headed.

Given the rapid proliferation of unmanned and autonomous technology, we are already in the midst of a new arms race. Many states are now designing, building, exporting, or importing various technologies for their military and security forces.

As far as I know, no nation is yet fielding wholly autonomous robotic vehicles on the battlefield. But that may change. In fact, I expect it will happen someday. It will probably be a bad thing when it does occur, but it very well may be inevitable at this point. (RELATED: Watch the Air Force Launch a Hypersonic Sled at 6,599 MPH! [VIDEO])

Top Image: U.S. Army photo by Markeith Horace, Maneuver Center of Excellence and Fort Benning Public Affairs Office.

Note: The appearance of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement.

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